Posts Tagged ‘organic’

Porous Organic Salts To Stabilize Fuel Cells

Scientists in China have developed a new class of porous organic salts with high proton conductivity to power fuel cells.

Organic Reaction Mechanisms 2014: An annual survey covering the literature dated January to December 2014

  Organic Reaction Mechanisms 2014, the 50th annual volume in this highly successful and unique series, surveys research on organic reaction mechanisms described in the available literature dated 2014. The following classes of organic reac…

US Government Declassifies Cold War Nuclear Test Footage

Hundreds of films showing US nuclear tests conducted between 1945 and 1962 have been found, analyzed and declassified by physicists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), officials at the California-based research facility announced this week in a statement. According to the laboratory, the US conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests over that span, and each […]

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Intrinsically stretchable and healable semiconducting polymer for organic transistors

Thin-film field-effect transistors are essential elements of stretchable electronic devices for wearable electronics. All of the materials and components of such transistors need to be stretchable and mechanically robust. Although there has been recent progress towards stretchable conductors, the realization of stretchable semiconductors has focused mainly on strain-accommodating engineering of materials, or blending of nanofibres or nanowires into elastomers. An alternative approach relies on using semiconductors that are intrinsically stretchable, so that they can be fabricated using standard processing methods. Molecular stretchability can be enhanced when conjugated polymers, containing modified side-chains and segmented backbones, are infused with more flexible molecular building blocks. Here we present a design concept for stretchable semiconducting polymers, which involves introducing chemical moieties to promote dynamic non-covalent crosslinking of the conjugated polymers. These non-covalent crosslinking moieties are able to undergo an energy dissipation mechanism through breakage of bonds when strain is applied, while retaining high charge transport abilities. As a result, our polymer is able to recover its high field-effect mobility performance (more than 1 square centimetre per volt per second) even after a hundred cycles at 100 per cent applied strain. Organic thin-film field-effect transistors fabricated from these materials exhibited mobility as high as 1.3 square centimetres per volt per second and a high on/off current ratio exceeding a million. The field-effect mobility remained as high as 1.12 square centimetres per volt per second at 100 per cent strain along the direction perpendicular to the strain. The field-effect mobility of damaged devices can be almost fully recovered after a solvent and thermal healing treatment. Finally, we successfully fabricated a skin-inspired stretchable organic transistor operating under deformations that might be expected in a wearable device.

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