Posts Tagged ‘certainly’

A Short History of Contested Presidential Elections

Noting that one candidate has been claiming the upcoming U.S. presidential vote is ‘rigged,’ our Washington-based blogger takes a look at the ways that past presidential elections have been less than clear-cut, and that ways in which the system bent to accommodate a peaceful transfer of power.

The post A Short History of Contested Presidential Elections appeared first on Social Science Space.

Archived Webinar: A Debate on Academic Freedom

On September 27, as part of Social Science Space’s series on academic freedom, three of the contributors to that series – Daniel Nehring, Dylan Kerrigan, and Joanna Williams – participated in an hour-long webinar to discuss some of the issues at the heart of this issue.

The post Archived Webinar: A Debate on Academic Freedom appeared first on Social Science Space.

Existing Career Incentives Are Often Bad for Science

A culture of bad science can evolve as a result of institutional incentives that prioritize simple quantitative metrics as measures of success, argues Paul Smaldino. But, he adds, not all is lost as new initiatives such as open data and replication are making a positive difference.

The post Existing Career Incentives Are Often Bad for Science appeared first on Social Science Space.

A Response to Dr. Swamidass’s Questions, Pt. 2: Answering the Questions

This is an ongoing discussion we are having with Dr. Swamidass over the question of Methodological Naturalism in science. For those who haven’t been keeping up, I posted Dr. Swamidass’s questions to critics of MN to UD a few weeks ago, then posted some of my questions for proponents of MN. Then, my first response […]

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